Most popular search terms by letter

If you ever find yourself wondering what you should be promoting on the web, here’s 260 suggestions that are probably based on more scientific data than the average “idea in a pub” approach. It is the top 10 most popular suggestions by letter of the alphabet which I managed to glean from Google. The data looks to be from November 2008 and also looks to be the main google.com index from an international perspective. So… based on some pretty large numbers I would say.

A: amazon; aol; addicting games; apple; American airlines; ask.com; att wireless; at&t; abc; american express

B: best buy; barack obama; bank of America; bebo; blackberry storm; bbc; black Friday; bed bath and beyond; barnes and noble; black Friday ads

C: craigslist; cnn; circuit city; costco; currency converter; craigslist.com; clun penguin; comcast; capital one; comcast.net

D: dictionary; dell; dancing with the stars; disney channel; delta; disney; direct tv; dominos; drudge; daylight savings time

E: ebay; espn; expedia; election results; election; exchange rates; electoral college; earth; ebuddy; edward cullen

F: facebook; fox news; facebook login; food network; friendster; free online games; free games; fallout 3; flickr

G: google; gmail; google maps; google earth; games; gamestop; gap; google translate; gossip girl; google chrome

H: hotmail; home depot; Halloween costumes; hulu; hi5; Halloween; hp; Hollister; heroes; honda

I: imdb; itunes; ikea; iphone; images; Indian airways; Indian railways; isohunt; ign; irctc

J: Jennifer Hudson; jcpenney; john mccain; jobs; java; jokes; jet blue; jetstar; james bond; jonas brothers

K: Kohis; kmart; Kelly blue book; kijiji; kim kardashian; katy perry; kayak; kanye west; kristen stewart; kings of leon

L: lowes; limewire; lyrics; lil wayne; linens and things; love quotes; line rider; love; lands end; lego

M: myspace; mapquest; msn; maps; myspace layouts; miniclip; macsys; msnbc; mapquest driving directions; movies

N: nfl; Netflix; news; nbc; new york times; Nordstrom; nba; nokia; nissan; nike

O: obama; orkut; old navy; office depot; orbitz; oprah; online games; overstock; obama birth certificate; office max

P: photobucket; paypal; pizza hut; Pandora; prop 8; pirate bay; party city; papa johns; pottery barn; priceline

Q: quantum of solace; quotes; qvc; Qantas; quicktime; quiznos; quets diagnostics; qwest; quizzes; quickbooks

R: runescape; rahm emanuel; recipes; radio shack; Robert pattinson; rate my professor; rediff; reverse phone lookup; real estate; rayanair

S: sears; southwest airlines; sarah palin; skype; staples; sams club; snl; sprint; sony; Spanish translation

T: target; twilight; toys r us; ticketmaster; thesaurus; Travelocity; translator; tv guide; tmobile; thanksgiving

U: utube; ups; usps; united airlines; utorrent; ufc; urban dictionary; us airways; ups tracking; uggs

V: Verizon wireless; Verizon; Victoria secret; vic; Vodafone; video; Vanessa hudgens; virgin mobile; veterens day; virgin

W: walmart: Wikipedia; weather; white pages; www.yahoo.com; webkinz; wiki; www.youtube.com; wells fargo; web md

X: xbox360; xbox; xm radio; xe; x factor; xbox live; xboard; xkcd; xanax; xbox 360 games

Y: youtube: yahoo; yahoo mail; yellow pages; yahoo finance; yahoo answers; yahoo messenger; yahoo maps; y8; yahoo games;

Z: zappos; zip codes; zillow; zac efron; zellers; zero punctuation; zune; zeitgeist; zip codes by city; zara

I don’t know if I was part of a Google beta or if everyone with an iPhone suddenly has this data. If you have an iPhone, try going to Google.com and seeing if your data is the same as mine. If not – tell me what country you are in (I am in the UK) to see if we can work out the discrepancy.

Why is this data interesting? You may ask. Well if you are an affiliate with a large mailing list, or you have a generic site with lots of broad traffic; it’s obvious really. It should help you to monetize your assets a little better. This would be especially useful if you happen to have content already alphabetized… although of course you need to find a way to still associate the content with the keyword to have any chance of relevancy. It might also help you to consider your next online project. Be careful though… Obama may not be such a popular search term in a few months.

I thought I’d take half an hour to list them all, to see if the data is useful to anyone.

If you are looking for other data on Keywords, you could start at Google Zeitgeist offerings or use receptional’s “related keywords tool” to generate new ideas around a theme.

If the list is useful, let me know and I might do it all again sometime.

Tata For Now.

Dixon.

New free SEO tools access

labs.receptional.com is a free tools area provided by my web marketing agency. We’ve just updated it so that we don’t have to sneak out secret logins at SES link training conferences or through Debra Mastaler‘s excellent Linkspiel blog.

You can now register on the site and when you do you get a few neat tools at your disposal:

  • SERP preview Gives you a quick look at how your web page should appear in Google Serps. You should be able to adapt your page description to make this as friendly as possible, encouraging a better click though rate.
  • Link Analyser is a favourite of mine, because it quickly compares the back-links of two competing domains and sorts them by backlink type. 
  • Theme Extractor takes a web page and tells you what a search engine is likely to think the content is about
  • Accessibility Viewer Shows you web page in high contrast layout.
  • Related Words Gives you an idea of what other words you might want to start optimising for or including in your web content.
  • Do us a favour… If you use the tools, please write about them somewhere and give us a link? If you would like them on your own site, give us a shout on the comments and suggestions… It will prompt us to build a free seo tools widget.

    Thanks,

    Dixon.

    Moving My Static Site to a WordPress site

    “The cobbler’s shoes” is a phrase that search marketers really should not have any excuse for. I often hear people saying “we don’t actually do it for our own site because we don’t have time”. If our own sites are not trying to do what they are meant to do, then how can we expect cients to act on our advice?

    Case in point… and guilty as charged… I finally relaunched my Murder Mystery Games site two weeks back and it involved dreaded URL changes. Arrgh! The redesign itself was done about 18 months ago, but the designer wasn’t SEO savvy and although I gave strict instructions, it’s weird how people can stick to instructions yet still come up with something entirely unworkable on search. I’m not complaining, it looks great. It looked even greater before I had to get a second web developer to change the whole new design and turn it into a WordPress theme. Doing that gave me some new challanges in the redesign.

    1: How to set up the development server? I was smart enough to realise that putting up the new site without blocking google during the design phase would potentially duplicate all my content. So I put the site behind a password protected directory. However… I was of course unable to move the DNS to the new site until the new site was completely set up with 301s and all the rest. So I took some bad advice… I set up wordpress on an unused domain, with a view to parkeing the main domain there afterwards and then I was told everything would be hunky dory by the server managers. Don’t try that at home folks! the database screws up, and when you try to fix it, you break wordpress. I ended up moving the DNS for just long enough for me to be able to set up a cpanel system on the new server, then moved it back (down time less than 2 minutes). I could then at least set up a properly configured WordPress installation.

    2: Keeping the URL structure… or not. Well I REALLY tried to keep the urls the same. The old site had .htm files and of course WordPress would rather not have these. Because the new site was using wordpress PAGES rather than Worpress POSTS, there was also not a plugin or url syntax that allowed me to add .htm to the page urls. So in the end I used a hack in the main WordPress code. Not ideal because I now have an unstable version of WordPress which I can’t update without remembering to change the code each time. But even more pointless is that when I went live, it didn’t quite work. I was trying to get urls like http://www.murdermysterygames.co.uk/will.htm but found these had a 301 to http://www.murdermysterygames.co.uk/will.htm/. Hey ho… I guess if the urls can’t stay identical then a 301 is OK, but after all the effort I’m a bit annoyed with myself. If I’d known I would have to 301 anyway, I would have dropped the .htm altogether.

    3. Don’t screw up the WWW non WWW decision! To my cost I accidently switched my site from redirecting to redirecting the www to non www. That wasn’t meant to happen and to fix it I had to first realize my mistake (which I realized as my traffic levels started tanking) and then get into PHPmyAdmin as I couldn’t fix it from WordPress. I hate that. Anyway – the long and short of it is that this post is ENTIRELY written so that I can get Google to go and spider http://murdermysterygames.co.uk to realise that it is a 301 and put my proper homepage: http://www.murdermysterygames.co.uk back in its index where it belongs. When you put up a new site, it is often the case that some of the old inner URLs don’t get spidered for months, because no internal pages link to them anymore. Oilman gave me the idea years ago of submitting the OLD url structure to google sitemaps, thus getting Google to find and update all the 301s quicker, but since I try not to use sitemaps at all, this post will have to do for the home page at least.

    4. Look out for those dead links: One area where webmastertools was REALLY helpful was seeing the broken inbound links. Google had already found 95 dead links to index.htm before I picked this one up. Next time I migrate a site I’ll be looking at this like watching paint dry. Once noticed, the fix was really easy. I always use John Godley’s “redirection” plugin and it seems to do the trick for me.

    So what happened?

    Well… there was a whole lot of other things that caused me problems. I’ve been kicking myself daily. But the main target phrases have maintained and improved. Interestingly, I also took the time to properly analyse my stats and found that most ofr my visitors were coming in using the word “free”. Surprise surprise… thiose ones weren’t converting. There were several other changes that I could now start making on the site – and will comtinue to do so – which will make the pain of transferring over to a CMS based solution very worthwhile in the long run. But… I’ll be honest… the traffic levels have dropped by 30% or so right now. That said… conversions have gone up considerably to nearly double what they were before. Part of the traffic level drop is due to the change in messaging… the visitors are now arriving with far more appropriate search phrases. But I am still hoping that the overall numbers will recover in the next week or two… in which case I should have increased my turnover by 300% all told.

    Better than a kick in the teeth huh?

    Next task… how to get the US traffic back to my UK business. I think I’ll have to work on a non .co.uk site for that. Luckily I have one… just another two years work…