Charlie Likes This

I am at BlueGlass – an SEO conference in Tampa, Florida.

Yesterday I got to speak a bit about Majestic and mention the new enhancements announced today. Below is what the audience thought of the new enhancements. (The banners people are holding up say “Charlie Likes This”. I am not altogether sure who Charlie is, but I am grateful for their votes of confidence.)

Blueglass show their "Likes" for the new Majestic enhancements by waving banners

 

The conference has taken place in an Air Conditioned tent next to the hotel pool! The weather, though, has been far from perfect, with the rain coming down – but at least this kept the sold out group in the tent rather than in the pool I guess.

The speakers have been really insightful and I hope to blog some of their thoughts over on Receptional. Some of the content, though, has been listed as “not for public consumption”.

Soho vs Enterprise SEO

It used to be absolute chalk and cheese! But now many of the factors affecting small businesses need the skillset of an Enterprise SEO company. That’s because even the smallest of companies are now using a CMS to build and manage their site. I don’t know the last time I saw one designed and built in Dreamweaver.

If you are a small business, your best logic is to build a site in WordPress. My audience knows that. ’nuff said. But actually, there are many reasons why WordPress MIGHT not the right choice for a business (Yes – every WP hack will defend this list):

  • No satisfactory shopping cart plugin for WordPress.
  • WordPress force you to be on a Unix based server using PHP/MySQL
  • Security issues as WP gets targeted so heavily
  • Inability to patch holes easily if Plugins don’t upgrade

But for me there is one over-arching reason why a company might choose not to use WordPress and go for an alternative option like Drupal:

Multi-level user control

WordPress is designed to be first and foremost a blog. It scales just fine when you switch from 1,000 readers a month to 1,000 users an hour… well… mostly fine… but it doesn’t scale well when you go from one webmaster who knows what WordPress is and how plugins work to a company where every employee has their own blogging area or responsibility for their own department content.

As corporation move their businesses truly into the modern era, they will need to make the switch from the website being the responsibility of the few, to the website being the amalgamation of the many employees and functions within a company. A chain of pubs needs to let every pub individually promote their offers and Meet ups. A solicitor practice needs to let lawyers keep their own area of expertise up to date but without affecting other areas.

There are plugins that TRY to work around this, but ultimately, WordPress is designed to be managed by a single person. It does not really have flexibility to allow one group of people the ability to ONLY change content and another group to ONLY change metadata or add video content. If you only have a hierarchical user permissions system, them ultimately, the guy that uploads Video might also put up a story which gets the site owners into deep water.

I think this is the over-riding reason why we encourage compinies that really are far sighted to consider Drupal over WordPress. Don’t get me wrong – they both ROCK – but sometimes WordPress tries to fit a square peg in a round hole.

Some Conference Discounts

I am at a few conferences in the US over the next few months, so I asked the organisers if there were any discount codes. Take them quick, as they may not last forever. Certainly, the Pubcon one expires in less than a month.

Search Exchange: 3-5 Oct, Charlotte, NC, USA. Get US$250 off with this: “majesticnews”

eMetrics: 18-20 Oct. and IMC: 19-21 Oct. New York, USA. Again, use this: “MAJNY1115”. (sorry – I don’t know what the discount amount is)

Pubcon: 7-10 Nov, Nevada, USA. Get 20% off before 15th October using “ex-4565120”.

If you are coming to any of these events, let me know. Maybe a beer?

Prediction Technology

My agency, Receptional, has been involved in some interesting projects over the years. It seems that when other agencies or consultancies are asked a question that just cannot be answered without a bit of clever programming, they bow out of the race. We find ourselves building ad-hoc tools for clients which do not cost the earth, but produce interesting data designed exclusively to answer the question at hand.

We think that this is something we would like to get involved in further. It’s interesting stuff. To that end, I am going to want to really start looking at technologies which “scientifically” try to make predictions and forecasts in new ways.
To that end, I will be starting a new blog soon – called PredictionTech.com and the first post is nearly ready to go. The point of the blog will be to report on new predictive analytics technologies and if you want to be in RIGHT AT THE START then you could do worse than following @PredictionTech on Twitter.  If you have technologies that you think PredictionTech should be reporting on and investigating, then send them through via that Twitter profile for consideration. If you want to write for PredictionTech (It’s unpaid, but may get you to some cool conferences) then also let us know.

Do you think the project will have legs? What would you like PredictionTech to look at?

Dixon.